Cirrus has the Best Selling Turbocharged Airplane

In 2019, Cirrus will surpass two-thousand (2,000) turbocharged airplane deliveries. Pilots’ desire for turbocharged power has carried the company past another milestone – Cirrus has more turbo deliveries than all other turbo single-engine manufactured planes combined since 2007.

In 2018, Cirrus sold 180 turbo SR22T planes.  Almost half of their piston engine deliveries are turbo. In just twelve years, customers have purchased more than 1,964 turbocharged planes from Cirrus. It’s the best selling turbo piston airplane.

Continuous improvements to the plane’s design have won customers over. Along with Cirrus, there are now only three other companies manufacturing traditional “four-adult” piston turbo single-engine planes. Currently, the Cirrus SR22T Turbo outsells the Piper Malibu Mirage 9:1 and the Cessna Turbo Stationair 6:1. 

The Cirrus “SR-series of high-performance piston airplanes are the best-selling aircraft in the world for [16] consecutive years – with over 7,260 aircraft operating in over 60 countries.”

Congratulations to the entire Cirrus Aircraft team.

Reference: GAMA.aero Annual Reports for piston-single engine shipments; and earlier turbo normalized (TAT) stats from Matt Bergwall, Cirrus Aircraft.

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How many airplanes does Cirrus Aircraft sell per year – 2018?

In 2018, Cirrus Aircraft delivered 443 airplanes.  That’s an 18% increase over the previous year.  

Cirrus Design Corp. dba Cirrus Aircraft has been manufacturing planes since 1999. As of December 31, 2018 total customer shipments stand at 7,349. Details by the numbers are in the table below:

Total Cirrus Aircraft Shipments

YearSF50 JetSR22 TurboSR22SR20SRVTotal
2018           63                 180              135                65               –                443 
2017           22                 174              135                46               –                377 
2016              3                 149              133                35               –                320 
2015             –                   142              128                31               –                301 
2014             –                   160              117                31               –                308 
2013             –                   132              112                32               –                276 
2012             –                     88                81                84               –                253 
2011             –                   102              105                48               –                255 
2010             –                   107              115                42               –                264 
2009             –                   150                88                28               –                266 
2008             –                   250              177              115                7              549 
2007             –                   300              288              112              10              710 
2006             –                     30              535              150                6              721 
2005             –                       –                475              116                9              600 
2004             –                       –                459                91                3              553 
2003             –                       –                355              112                2              469 
2002             –                       –                292              105               –                397 
2001             –                       –                124                59               –                183 
2000             –                       –                    –                  95               –                  95 
1999             –                       –                    –                     9               –                     9 
Total           88             1,964          3,854          1,406              37          7,349 

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Connecting Aviators® and related marks and logos are property of wikiWings®


Turbo Avidyne SR22-G3, That was then, This is now

How much have pre-owned prices changed for Turbo Cirrus SR22TN-G3 aircraft with the Avidyne flight deck? In 2008, the base price for a new model Avidyne Turbo was $446,600 (non-GTS); while the Avidyne GTS SR22TN-G3 Turbo came out of the factory at $539,535. But that was then and this is now. Continue reading “Turbo Avidyne SR22-G3, That was then, This is now”

What are the asking prices for Avidyne SR22-G3 Turbo planes?

From 2007 into 2008, it’s estimated that Cirrus shipped about 290 generation three SR22TN turbo normalized airplanes equipped with Avidyne avionics. Recently, nine of those planes were posted online for sale in the United States, which represents about 3% of the manufacturer production on the market. Anything less than 3% is considered supply contraction. Continue reading “What are the asking prices for Avidyne SR22-G3 Turbo planes?”

We recently completed mountain flight training

Cirrus Perspective SR22TN, Leadville, Colorado. Highest airport in North America (KLXV) 9,934 feet.
Cirrus Perspective SR22TN, Leadville, Colorado. Highest airport in North America (KLXV) 9,934 feet.

We recently completed three days of mountain flight training in the Colorado Rockies.  It was an excellent program with CSIP instructors and we had good weather. The training included a landing at the Leadville-Lake County Airport (KLXV) in Leadville, Colorado. It’s North America’s highest airport at an elevation of 9,934 feet.

We scheduled our instruction through Alpine Flight Training which is based at Eagle County Regional Airport. They have a detailed website where you can find contact numbers if you’re interested in more information.

Giddy up!

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High Flight 2016

2008 SR22TN-G3, 194 knots TAS, 75% power, FL 20,000 feet, photo credit wikiWings
2008 SR22TN-G3, 194 knots TAS, 75% power, FL 20,000 feet, photo credit wikiWings

Pilots have a different perspective. Flying above everything on the ground and at times soaring into the flight levels.  This year our Cirrus SR22 Turbo high flight was 20,000 feet on a short cross-country (less than 3 hours). Continue reading “High Flight 2016”

You should know this step if you fly Cirrus SR22 Turbo

Flying the step Cirrus SR22TN, FL17.5, TAS 189 kts., GS 194 kts, credit wikiWings
Flying the step, Cirrus SR22TN, FL17.5, TAS 189 kts., GS 194 kts., 76% power., 2510 RPM, 29.7 MP, 15.7 GPH, credit wikiWings

Do you always reach best true airspeed in cruise? You should know this step to use aircraft momentum from slightly above a selected altitude to accelerate into best cruise speed.  The procedure has at least 3 benefits:

  • It’s a process check
  • No delay – you don’t wait on engine power
  • Cooler cylinder head temperatures

Here’s a process check using the GFC-700 autopilot in a Cirrus Perspective SR22TN Turbo.

Process Check

In a full power climb from below, select an altitude 100 feet above the target cruise level, in this example 17,600 feet. Upon reaching 17,600 feet, reset the altitude select to 17,500 feet. Then touch the autopilot Vertical Speed (VS) and dial in a 400 foot per minute descent.  This will set the plane in a slightly nose down position and use aircraft momentum to accelerate into best true airspeed (TAS). Continue reading “You should know this step if you fly Cirrus SR22 Turbo”

Getting on the step with a full power climb from below

Cirrus SR22TN Turbo, transition instructions from full power climb to cruise power, photo credit wikiWings
Cirrus SR22TN Turbo, transition instructions from full power climb to cruise power, photo credit wikiWings

Getting ‘on the step’ in a climb from below is easier with a Turbo Cirrus SR22 because the engine produces 100% full power all the way into the flight levels.  Pilot work-load is reduced because no mixture adjustments are required and there are no cowl flaps.  You just maintain full throttle and full mixture all the way up.

In a climb from below into cruise, you cannot always use the same procedure and get the same result.  Powering to best cruise speed can be affected by a number of variables; such as, airplane weight, balance, and density altitude.  Your time at full power may change if you have more fuel or an extra passenger or baggage in back (weight & balance) or hotter day (density altitude).

You’ll want to verify that the plane has accelerated to best cruise speed. Continue reading “Getting on the step with a full power climb from below”

Two Turbo Cirrus pilots realize they have not always been in level cruise flight

Cirrus SR22TN-G3 Turbo, smooth air 10,500 feet above the GA traffic, blue sky, photo credit wikiWings
Cirrus SR22TN-G3 Turbo, smooth air 10,500 feet above the GA traffic, blue sky, photo credit wikiWings

I know two pilots that have flown a Turbo Cirrus for about 3 years.  And, they recently realized their Cirrus has not always been established in best performance cruise flight based on reading AOPA Pilot and letters from fellow aviators regarding Barry Schiff’s article “Stepping Along, ‘On the Step’ Fact or Fiction.”

Barry says, ” many pilots tend to prematurely and impatiently reduce power after leveling off.  The throttle often is retarded before the airplane has had a chance to accelerate to normal cruise speed.  In a sense, the airplane is established in a subtle form of mushing flight.”

When entering a selected cruise altitude from below, a Cirrus SR22TN Turbo may require up to 2 minutes at full power to pull the airplane into level cruise flight.  But have you ever listened to a turbocharged TCM IO-550 engine at full power in level cruise flight?  If you have then you understand why some pilots may pull the power back after about a half-minute.  In less than a minute a turbo Cirrus will accelerate and appear to be in level flight.  Continue reading “Two Turbo Cirrus pilots realize they have not always been in level cruise flight”