What equipment shipped on Cirrus SR22-G1 Segment 3

The third wave of Cirrus SR22-G1s were shipped from late 2002 into 2004 (serial numbers 435-819). In this Segment, Cirrus achieved another milestone by creating the first general aviation airplane with a “glass panel.” And, conventional six-pack flight instruments literally became a GA thing of the past.

The Avidyne Entegra Primary Flight Display was offered initially as a $24,500 option. But it was such a hit almost every plane going out was purchased with the PFD. So, Cirrus made the glass panel standard equipment by mid-2003. Several equipment configurations were marketed with these planes. Let’s look at the details: Continue reading “What equipment shipped on Cirrus SR22-G1 Segment 3”

What equipment shipped on Cirrus SR22-G1 Segment 2

During 2002, a second wave of Cirrus SR22-G1s were shipped which we’ve listed as Segment 2 serial numbers 142-434. These planes were delivered with conventional six-pack flight instruments, Garmin radios, S-TEC auto pilot and the Avidyne Multi-Function Display (MFD). Cirrus marketed these SR22-G1s with three equipment configurations (A. B & C). Let’s look at the details: Continue reading “What equipment shipped on Cirrus SR22-G1 Segment 2”

What equipment shipped on Cirrus SR22-G1 Segment 1

The first SR22-G1s shipped during the years 2001 – 2002 (Segment 1 serial numbers 002-141). These planes were delivered with a conventional six-pack of flight instruments and ARNAV multifunction display for navigation. Cirrus marketed these first SR22-G1s with three equipment configurations. Let’s look at the details: Continue reading “What equipment shipped on Cirrus SR22-G1 Segment 1”

How many Cirrus SR22-G1 airplanes shipped?

From 2001 to 2004, Cirrus shipped 818 first generation SR22 airplanes (serial numbers 002-819). During this period Cirrus avionics and options progressed. The SR22-G1 equipment progression can be grouped into three segments:

Three Serial Segments to SR22-G1 shipments
  • Segment 1: Serials 002-141; Six-Pack, ARNAV, Garmin radios, S-TEC auto pilot
  • Segment 2: Serials 142-434; Six-Pack, Avidyne MFD, Garmin radios, S-TEC auto pilot
  • Segment 3: Serials 435-819; Avidyne PFD MFD, Garmin, S-TEC and The Centennial Limited Edition (100 units)

Continue reading “How many Cirrus SR22-G1 airplanes shipped?”

Cirrus SR22 Generation One (G1) Introduction

By the late 1990’s the Klapmeier brothers had moved away from constructing kit planes. They had a bigger vision that would change general aviation. In 1998 the FAA certified their first airplane – The Cirrus SR20.  Nine certified SR20’s were shipped in 1999 as reported by the General Aviation Management Association (GAMA). Two years later the SR22 was certified and GA would not be the same. Continue reading “Cirrus SR22 Generation One (G1) Introduction”

A quick reference list to Cirrus SR22 Generations manufactured

Here’s a quick reference list of Cirrus SR22 Generations that have been manufactured. If you’re interested in transitioning to Cirrus Aircraft this may be a good starting point for categorizing significant model changes important to you and establishing a budget. You’ll benefit from having a framework to compare aircraft if you’re in the market to buy.  Knowing the design changes and production quantities will help you better understand how supply and demand affects market prices.

Summary SR22 Generations and Units Shipped
SR22 Generations Years Avionics Units Shipped*
Generation 6 2017 Perspective  TBD
Generation 5 2013 – 2016 Perspective  1,073
Generation 3 2008 – 2012 Perspective  1,051
Generation 3 2007 – 2008 Avidyne  678
Generation 2 2004 – 2007 Avidyne  1,616
Generation 1 2001 – 2004 Avidyne**  818
Total SR22’s  5,194

*Estimated SR22 units shipped by Generation manufactured.
**Avidyne Avionics became the G1 and G2 standard but the first SR22 planes were shipped with six-pack flight instruments and ARNAV MFD units.
Note: Cirrus skipped the Generation 4 label and designated the 2013 SR22 models G5’s. Continue reading “A quick reference list to Cirrus SR22 Generations manufactured”

Embark is a value for pilots transitioning to pre-owned Cirrus Aircraft

Here’s the right way to take-off in your new airplane. Embark provides Cirrus Standardized Instructor Pilots (CSIPs) at no charge to pilots purchasing pre-owned Cirrus Aircraft.

2017 Cirrus Aircraft SR22, Oshkosh WI, photo credit wikiWings
2017 Cirrus Aircraft SR22, Oshkosh WI, photo credit wikiWings

The training is provided by the Cirrus network of instructors and paid for by Cirrus. Embark was created to train pilots buying Cirrus aircraft on the used market. It doesn’t matter if you buy the plane from an individual or broker.

Here’s the thing, statistics for fatal and non-fatal accidents indicate pilots flying without type-specific training from Cirrus trained instructors are at higher risk. Let’s repeat this message, pilots choosing not to receive instruction from CSIP’s are at higher risk for an accident.

Cirrus is a leader in developing world-class flight training materials and proficient flight instruction. Their company culture is dedicated to aviation safety. Embark raises that commitment even higher.

If you’re an individual or multi-owner partnership thinking about purchasing a pre-owned Cirrus Aircraft you need to check out the Embark program. All members of a partnership are eligible to receive transition training at no charge. Continue reading “Embark is a value for pilots transitioning to pre-owned Cirrus Aircraft”

What are your mountain flying weather minimums?

Loren French, with Alpine Flight Training, teaches an introductory mountain flying course aimed at piston-engine pilots navigating below 12,000 feet in VFR conditions. Here’s his guidance on weather minimums for pilots new to mountain flying:

San Isabel National Forest, mountains, scattered clouds & blue sky, Salida, United States, photo credit wikiWings
San Isabel National Forest, mountains, scattered clouds & blue sky, Salida, United States, photo credit wikiWings

What are Your Mountain Flying Wx Minimums?

  • Visibility: Minimum 10 miles along your route
  • Wind Aloft: Maximum 25 knots forecast between 9,000 and 12,000
  • Cloud bases: 2,000 feet above all ridges and passes along your route

Weather minimums are part of Loren’s guidance to develop a strategy that puts conditions in your favor.  If your weather minimums cannot be met look for a suitable alternate route, delay the flight or cancel and rent a car.

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What are basic mountain route planning considerations?

Loren French, with Alpine Flight Training, teaches an introductory mountain flying course aimed at piston-engine pilots navigating below 12,000 feet in VFR conditions. His guidance is to develop a strategy that puts conditions in your favor. Loren’s route planning strategy includes these four basic topics listed below:

Basic Mountain Route planning considerations:
Foreflight VFR chart Rocky Mountains with user defined waypoints, photo credit wikiWings
ForeFlight VFR chart of the Rocky Mountains with user defined waypoints, photo credit wikiWings

Survival: Avoid routes over inhospitable remote terrain were it would be difficult to survive at least one night waiting for rescue. GPS direct is usually not the safest route in the mountains.
Terrain: Children of the magenta line beware.  Mountain flying below FL120 involves user waypoints – points in space – not predefined aeronautical intersections. Only fly terrain routes compatible with your aircraft and your capabilities. You’ll want to be knowledgeable in reading topographical maps. Plan your route over the correct passes, valleys, drainages, etc.
Performance: Understand the performance of your airplane and develop critical decision making skills for takeoff, climb and landing at mountain altitudes.
Weather: What are your go – no go mountain flying weather minimums?

Develop your mountain flying proficiency with an expert local instructor.

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Copyright 2017 wikiWings LLC, All rights reserved

What’s the mountain performance of your airplane?

2008 Cirrus Perspective SR22TN Turbo, Eagle County Airport (KEGE) Colorado, blue sky and scattered clouds, photo credit wikiWings
2008 Cirrus Perspective SR22TN Turbo, Eagle County Airport (KEGE) Colorado, blue sky and scattered clouds, photo credit wikiWings

What’s your airplane’s performance at mountain altitudes? Airplane performance is one of five primary topics discussed in the Alpine Flight Training course.

The Pilot Operating Handbook (POH), Section 5 contains performance data for takeoff, climb gradients and landing distances, which you’ll want to study. Your airplane’s performance will vary based on weight, altitude and air temperature. And, keep in mind the POH numbers listed are for a new aircraft. Your plane’s age and condition can be a factor in actual performance.

Alpine Flight Training, suggests creating a blank table template and entering the actual performance for your individual airplane. Training with a local expert can help you gain a better understanding of your airplane’s true performance in the mountains at high altitude. It’s said, a normally aspirated airplane will lose about 3% in engine performance for every 1,000 feet.  At an altitude of 10,000 feet that’s a 30% loss in engine power. Continue reading “What’s the mountain performance of your airplane?”